Getting ready for company..

Living On Oxygen for Life

This is how K looks out for me. He’s awesome. I meant to post this last year. I just wanted to show you that there are some really great spouses out there. There are so many things that are just too hard for me to do and that’s when K steps in and takes over. I love this man.

Me: (finally lying in bed with Bipap & oxygen on totally exhausted from working along side K to super clean the house) Thank you so much for your help K.

K: (while mopping the hallway) Is the music too loud?

Me: No. Right now I don’t care about the music or the light being on. I’m exhausted. What you’re doing is so appreciated.

K: (stops mopping) This is what you wanted done.. What you needed, right?

Me: What you’ve done is awesome. You’ve gone above my expectations. Thank you.

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14 thoughts on “Getting ready for company..

  1. Nothing can ever explain how it feels to have an understanding and supportive spouse when you have something chronic. Right now I am in bed relaxing, catching up on blog (which I have not done in months) after a long day, and my wife is out in the living room painting the walls. Why am I relaxing and not painting? She does not want me inhaling the fumes! ❀

    • Ack! Paint fumes! So totally understandable. K was painting in the spare room closet last week and I thought I was going to have to put on a gas mask from the fumes. The door was even closed but the smell spread throughout the house. He couldn’t smell it. My lungs are so sensitive now. There is an additive that you can pour into your paint to help kill the smell. He just got cheap paint this time since it was for the closet. I’m so glad your wife is understanding. πŸ™‚

    • I really envy people like you. It’s been over 2 1/2 years since my husband passed and it gets lonely. But whenever I tell a man I’m on oxygen they run. I feel like I’ll never meet anyone.

  2. I love reading these posts. Although, I’m 67 years old, my husband has passed away and my children are grown and no longer need me. I feel like people think I look funny with my cannula and oxygen. It’s bad enough that I didn’t have much of a life because everyone I loved was gone, but when I was told I was to use oxygen 24/7, I felt really weird. I wish I could be one of these people on oxygen who are successful and happy.

      • Hi…I think i used the wrong term. What I meant was, some people on oxygen look so confident and happy. I’m always feeling like I’m being stared at.

      • What works for me when I catch someone staring me is to smile at them and/or say “hi!” It seems that a little unexpected kindness given to the person staring, knocks them off guard. They’ll either smile or say hi back or turn away. I think most people are just very curious and think it might be rude to acknowledge you by asking a question. Some people think that oxygen is worn by older people who are cranky and are too scared to even attempt to get to know the one wearing oxygen. So, to me, I take upon myself to make whoever is staring feel more comfortable about approaching me by smiling. Sometimes I wonder if they are staring because I’m wearing oxygen or if it’s because I’m laughing or acting pretty goofy.

  3. Michelle, first my deepest condolences on your loss. I can not even begin to imagine life without my wife. As far as using oxygen goes, I started to use for exertion when I was 46. I have always been a very active and healthy man so I did not and still do not look like a person with any conditions. When I walk, I walk at a very brisk pace. Very brisk. I am always told that I look much younger than my age. When I was 46 I was told I looked 30. Now at 55 I am told I look 40. So when I started using oxygen it was at the gym and people thought it some new exercise fad and kept asking me about it. I would have fun. Rather than explain my conditions, and not wanting to be labeled I told people that was not from this planet and was having trouble assimilating to Earth’s atmosphere. I now need to use it more than before, not 24/7, but if I am going to the mall or grocery shopping. People look at me very strangely and almost pitiful. I think that because I am not the stereotypical senior citizen and I use an ultra small portable concentrator that most people have never seen, people think I am terminal. So if I catch someone staring at me I just smile and say something dumb like “lunch. I have an eating disorder and I just pump the food straight to the back of my throat”. Some people laugh, some get mad but I have reached a point where I really don’t care what people think. Of all the medicines I take, the most important is my O2, so I just ignore the stares. If you are feeling self conscious, take a deep breath and say “Life”.

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